This history was transcribed exactly as written from
"The HISTORY of PETTIS COUNTY, MISSOURI, Illustrated, 1882
Compiled With Great Care By Special Historians, Re-Print, The Printery, Clinton, MO.
Excerpts from pages 346, 362, 363, 374, 807, 809, and Pages 827 - 829

{Pages 827 - 829}

HISTORY OF BLACKWATER TOWNSHIP.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES
CHAPTER XIII. -- BLACKWATER TOWNSHIP.

SAMUEL SHANKS.

     Post-office, Brownsville. One of Pettis County's most honored citizens is the subject of this sketch. He what may be strictly termed a self-made man. His father, Jacob Shanks, was a native of Virginia, but died in a few years after emigrating to Missouri. Samuel was the fourth child in a family of eight children. He received a practical education from the common subscription schools of this State. When he was thirteen years old he was taken with his father's family to Osage County, where he remained until the year 1846, when he enlisted as a soldier in the Mexican War, remaining until its close. He then returned to his home in Missouri. In 1849, Mr s., like many others of that day, caught the fold fever, which took him to California, but he only remained in the golden State about eighteen months, when he returned to his native State, and in the spring of 1850 he moved to Pettis County, locating in the northwestern part of the county, where he has since resided. Mr. Shanks was married March, 1852, to Miss Bobbitt, a daughter of John Bobbitt, of Johnson County. From this union there were four children, three of whom are now living, viz: Emma, now the wife of

Will D. Carpenter; Florence, now the wife of Dr. Seaton Tyler, and David, at home. Mrs. Shanks dying, he was again married to Miss Lucy B. Tate, of Texas. From this union there were four children, three of whom are now living, viz: Fox, Wilford, and Daisy. Mr. Sharks owns one of those model farms, "the Prairie Home," for which the northwestern part of the county is noted, 640 acres in extent, and like the other farms of this section, it is well watered,has a handsome residence and fine out-buildings, fences, etc. a fine view of which produced on this page. Mr. Shanks farms extensively, though keeping many acres of his farm in meadow and blue grass, upon which he has a choice herd of twenty-five Short-horns, representing the Young Mary and Rose of Sharon families, led by the Second Duke of the Roses, an animal of great merit. He also has in his barns a fine selection of brood mares, among them one sired by old St. Lewis Denmark, that has carried off many prizes. Mr. Shanks is a thorough stock man, and has been for years President of the Brownsville District Fair. He is a man of influence and character, one of whom his county can justly feel proud.

{Pages 346 & 348 - excerpt}

HISTORY OF PETTIS COUNTY, MISSOURI.
Chapter XI. AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES

Major Wm. Gentry and Capt. Sam'l Shanks are among the large successful farmers who have always taken a deep interest in the agricultural interests of their county.

{Pages 362 & 363 - excerpt}

HISTORY OF PETTIS COUNTY, MISSOURI.
CHAPTER XIII. -- PETTIS COUNTY - LIVE STOCK
.

     Joining "Avondale," on the east, is "Prairie Home," the model farm of Capt. Samuel Shanks, consisting of six hundred and twenty acres, which, like the others last mentioned, possesses many natural advantages for stock raising. There are two hundred and eighty acres in plow land, one hundred of the remainder in meadow and blue grass pasture, all well fenced and conveniently divided into fields and a fine two-story brick residence and outbuildings, (a view of which appears elsewhere in this volume), and general surroundings in perfect keeping. Capt. Shanks has a herd of twenty five high-bred Short-horn cattle, a number of high-bred Denmark brood mares, one of which is Denmark Maid, a noted mare--she having taken fifty-seven premiums, always taking the premium at every fair where she was exhibited, and feeds two hundred steers, six hundred swine and from three to five hundred mutton sheep.

{Pages 373 & 374 -- excerpt}

HISTORY OF PETTIS COUNTY, MISSOURI.
CHAPTER XIV -- RAILROAD HISTORY

Chief among the leaders in constructing the Lexington branch of the Missouri Pacific are the names of Maj. Wm. Gentry, Reece Hughes, Col. T. F. Houston, Judge Gibson, Col. Joe Higgins, Capt. Samuel Shanks, with many others on the line of the road."

{Page 807 - excerpt}

HISTORY OF BLACKWATER TOWNSHIP
CHAPTER XIII. BLACKWATER TOWNSHIP
Ancient Mining

     On the farm of Capt. Samuel Shanks is a peculiar kind of shale filled with large shells. This particular formation is found in large quantities on the top of a high knoll about ten feet below the surface overlying a strata of coal.

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